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Rancho Adobe Museum site of naturalist course

Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum. Rancho Adobe Museum Fall UC California Certification course examines natural and cultural state history, and South Bay ecology RANCHO DOMINGUEZ, Calif  (MNS) — The Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum will host a UC California

Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum.

Rancho Adobe Museum Fall UC California Certification course examines natural and cultural state history, and South Bay ecology

RANCHO DOMINGUEZ, Calif  (MNS) — The Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum will host a UC California Naturalist Certification Course this fall – Sept. 7 through Dec. 14, 2019.

Classes will be held every Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. with the exception of Nov. 30 and Dec. 7. The course includes three Saturday field trips which will be held for extended hours on Oct. 5, Nov. 2, and Nov. 23.

Participants complete a 40-plus hour hands-on course with expert instructors studying natural history, environmental interpretation, and conservation stewardship. The course covers the natural and cultural history of California with an in-depth look at our South Bay ecology.

Through field trips, classroom instruction and hands-on exercises, participants will observe and learn about the variety of plants and animal communities of our region. Through the course, participants will learn tools to hone their observation skills and collaborate together in groups for the benefit of successful group projects.

The course fee is $325. Four UC academic credits are obtainable upon completion of this course for an additional fee. The course textbook is titled, The California Naturalist Handbook (2013, UC Press).

The Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum is Located at 18127 S. Alameda St., Rancho Dominguez.

History Dominguez Rancho Adobe

The Dominguez Rancho Adobe is California Historical Landmark Number 152, and in 1976 was placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior.

The adobe of Manuel Dominguez, on the Mexican land grant of Rancho San Pedro, was completed in 1826. The home features 2-foot-thick (0.61 m) walls, heavy timbers and a flat, tarred roof. Much of the furniture is original to the Dominguez family.

The Friends of Rancho San Pedro operate the adobe ranch home as the Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum. The Friends provide guided tours of the house, as well as host many educational programs about ranch life and early California history.

The Rancho San Pedro is the site of the First Spanish land grant in California. The land was granted in 1784 by King Carlos III to Juan Jose Dominguez, a retired Spanish soldier who came to California with the Portola expedition and later with Father Juniperro Serra. This grant encompassed 75,000 acres and included the entire Los Angeles harbor.

Due to a lack of heirs, the land was then passed to Cristobal Dominguez, a nephew of Juan Jose. Cristobal’s son, Manuel Dominguez, would succeed him in taking control of the land upon his father’s death. It was under Manuel’s guidance that the Rancho as it is seen today was constructed in 1826.

During this time Manuel was also focused on acquiring a U.S. land patent, which would solidify ownership of the Rancho under U.S.law. The patent was granted and signed by President James Buchanan on Dec. 18, 1858, more than 7 years after it was first requested and nearly 75 years after the original land grant. This was the first U.S. land patent granted in California.

However, throughout the years of political turmoil in California, prolonged court battles over ownership of the Rancho, numerous surveys of the land, and the sale of some parcels, the U.S. land patent stated that the Rancho now encompassed 25,000 acres, far fewer than the 75,000 acres included in the original land grant.

Manuel Dominguez was a business-savvy young man who could speak both Spanish and English as a result of successful trade. He was also the only one of his siblings who could read and write. At age 29, he was elected as Mayor of Los Angeles. Dominguez later became one of 47 delegates in California to sign the State Constitution. Not long thereafter, President James Buchanan signed the very first land patent granted in California to Manuel Dominguez, solidifying the grounds in use by the museum today

Metropolis News Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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