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Keeping it Real Estate: ‘Black Homes Matter’

Real Estate: ‘Black Homes Matter’ in the Black community; laying down homeownership roots means everything By ODEST RILEY, Jr., Contributing Writer With all the issues in our country surrounding racial inequality and police brutality, I sometimes wonder what

Real Estate: ‘Black Homes Matter’ in the Black community; laying down homeownership roots means everything

By ODEST RILEY, Jr., Contributing Writer

With all the issues in our country surrounding racial inequality and police brutality, I sometimes wonder what happened to the Black community. Most people simply chalk up all our issues to drug wars and gang violence.

Odest Riley, Jr.

Odest Riley, Jr.

This is an easy way for people to shift the blame and make everything seem as though all of our issues were brought upon us by our own actions, alleviating any guilt from our shoulders.

And to be honest some of the issues in African-American communities are brought on by our own doing. But once you start to drill down to find out where the issues stem from, it all goes back to our lack of Black community and family.

In the 1950s America became obsessed with the thought of housing projects; huge low-income buildings built to be self-sustaining communities, playgrounds, schools and anything else needed; which in theory sounds great, but then you realize how much money, infrastructure and cooperation it takes to run them.

These urban environments quickly became dilapidated slums full of African-American families who had been ushered from their poor, tightly-knit rural communities into the city, with the promise of growth and inclusion. Unfortunately, the only way that a family could actually live there, was if all the fathers left the household, so that the family could qualify for government housing assistance.

As a consequence, our fathers essentially were replaced with the government. Our homes and communities were robbed of the leadership needed to self-police themselves; an issue that can still be seen in our communities today. This issue is showcased every day in America by the lack of two parent households in our communities.

What does this have to do with real estate?

Ask yourself who is there to tell our young men not to join gangs? Who is there to set an example for our daughters of how a man should love a woman? There is no one there for guidance, which results in little boys with no direction, growing into grown men with no direction and unplanned under age pregnancies by young women looking for love.

So what does this have to do with real estate? Everything! If you are really looking for change in the way African-Americans are treated in this country, it starts with laying down roots in this country with like-minded people, who in turn become like-minded families, and communities. Another solution is to buy homes together certain areas. If you can’t afford a home on your income, alone, buy one with another family member or a friend. Other ethnic groups do it, why can’t we?

As these communities grow and our income taxes become more prevalent, I assure you that your local officials will start to take notice. Because one thing we must all realize is that in the U.S. money and votes talk. if you don’t have any skin in the game, no one cares what you have to say.

Odest T. Riley, Jr., is a licensed real estate agent and president of WLM Financial in Inglewood. Reach him at (310) 905-7421, by e-mail: odest@wlmfinancial, or by snail mail, 111 N. La Brea Ave., No. 406-B, Inglewood, CA 90301.

 

Compton Herald is a digital news publication providing clear, fair and current news, information and commentary about Compton, the Los Angeles metropolitan area, Los Angeles County, California, and the world.

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