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Door open to other immigrants, shut in face of Haitians

Obama Administration announces immigration policy change allowing border officials to turn away Haitians MEXICO CITY — The Obama administration, responding to an extraordinary wave of Haitians seeking to enter the United States, said last week it

Obama Administration announces immigration policy change allowing border officials to turn away Haitians

MEXICO CITY — The Obama administration, responding to an extraordinary wave of Haitians seeking to enter the United States, said last week it would fully resume deportations of undocumented Haitian immigrants. After an earthquake devastated parts of Haiti in 2010, the United States suspended deportations, saying that sending Haitians back to the country at a time of great instability would put their lives at risk. About a year later, officials partly resumed deportations, focusing on people convicted of serious crimes or those considered a threat to national security.

But since last spring, thousands of Haitian migrants who had moved to Brazil in search of work have been streaming north, mostly by land, winding up at American border crossings that lead to Southern California.

Few have arrived with American visas, but nearly all have been allowed to enter the U.S. because immigration officials were prohibited, under the modified deportation policy, from using the so-called fast-track removal process often employed at the border for new, undocumented arrivals.

Meanwhile, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and Southern California will welcome more than 1,200 newly naturalized citizens, Nov. 8 at 9 a.m. at the City National Grove of Anaheim. This ceremony is part of USCIS’ annual recognition of Veterans Day which will host more than 25 Veterans Day-themed naturalization ceremonies across the country this year, where veterans, service members, and military spouses will become America’s newest citizens. At the ceremony, USCIS will have the honor of naturalizing two service members, to which we as a nation owe a special gratitude.

Nearly 7,500 people will take the Oath of Allegiance in ceremonies nationwide that honor the sacrifices military members and their families made by serving our country.

The soon-to-be new US citizens represent 76 different countries. The top 10 countries represented at both ceremonies include:

Mexico, 448; Vietnam, 133; Philippines, 125; China, 84; El Salvador, 61; South Korea, 47; Iran, 42; India, 34; Guatemala; 31; and Taiwan, 22.

Information in this story was partially derived from the U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services. 

 

 

 

Compton Herald is a digital news publication providing clear, fair and current news, information and commentary about Compton, the Los Angeles metropolitan area, Los Angeles County, California, and the world.

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