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Compton’s Own Duane Jackson, more than a hero

Ground Zero World Trade Center, Sept. 11, 2001, a day that will forever live in infamy along with the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. NDTV screen grab Compton’s Own heroism and bravery on display in

Ground Zero World Trade Center, Sept. 11, 2001, a day that will forever live in infamy along with the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. NDTV screen grab

Compton’s Own heroism and bravery on display in New York on 9/11, and later in a foiled attempted terrorist car bombing

Compton’s Own, Duane Jackson, a U.S. Navy veteran from the Vietnam era, and current New Yorker, where he currently serves the “Big Apple,” as a street vendor in Time Square, is more than a hero of sorts.

Jackson attended Manual Dominguez High School, graduating in 1970. For him and some 600 fellow alumni, the 50th Year Class Reunion approaches in 2020. Planning efforts are currently underway.

Along the timeline, alums have plenty of stories to share, but none more poignant or tragic than Duane Jackson’s.

In a September 2011 interview, Jackson recounts the eventful day of Sept. 1, 2001, otherwise known as 911, when two hijacked jetliners United Airlines Flight 175, a Boeing 767; and American Airlines Flight 11, also a Boeing 767; slammed into the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center, in the worst-ever terror attack on U.S. soil.

Two other hijacked aircraft American Airlines Flight 77, a Boeing 757; and United Airlines Flight 93, a Boeing 757; crash into the Pentagon, and into the countryside southeast of Pittsburgh in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, respectively.

The Sept. 11 attacks were a series of four coordinated terrorist attacks by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaeda carried out by 19 hijackers against the U.S. The total number of American lives lost was 2,977

Jackson was a street vendor on New York’s famed Times Square six blocks from ground zero on that eventful day. It is seared in his memory as he can still see the horrifying images in his mind. His actions in the aftermath may have saved lives and spared more injury.

“I can still remember that plane turning sideways banking toward the World Trade Center, and the eerie sound of the engines and gears grinding as it passed overhead,” Jackson recalled.

Courtesy Duane Jackson

 

 

 

 

 

Jarrette Fellows, Jr. is Publisher and Editor of Compton Herald. He attended junior and senior high school in Compton, and is an alumnus of California State University, Los Angeles.

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