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Blood Moon drips lore on Earth

The Blood Moon, a rare and spectacular cosmic event occurred Jan. 20-21, 2019. The image here is not factual, but an artistically manipulated rendering. Blood Moon cosmic phenomenon has both scientific and Biblical origins The Blood Moon,

The Blood Moon, a rare and spectacular cosmic event occurred Jan. 20-21, 2019. The image here is not factual, but an artistically manipulated rendering.

Blood Moon cosmic phenomenon has both scientific and Biblical origins

The Blood Moon, a rare and spectacular cosmic event occurred Jan. 20-21, that had shutterbugs the world over snapping photographic devices with abandon.

The event was actually a total lunar eclipse. The term Blood Moon describes a lunar eclipse when the totally eclipsed moon appears “blood red.” The January event will not occur again until May 2021.

In this photo the totally eclipsed moon glows with a reddish color against the background stars over Stedman, N.C., Monday, Jan. 21, 2019. 

The scientific explanation, according to astronomers, is that a full moon nearly always appears coppery red during a total lunar eclipse, because the dispersed light from all the Earth’s sunrises and sunsets fall on the face of the moon at mid-eclipse. Astronomers did not describe the phenomenon as a blood moon, however, but rather blood red.

The more dramatic distinction is a combination of a Biblical passage and the exegesis thereof by Christian pastor John Hagee, who popularized the term blood red in his book, Four Blood Moons, in which he explores the spiritual connection of certain celestial events to biblical prophecy, based on Joel 2:31 – “The sun shall be turned into darkness, and the moon into blood, before the great and terrible day of the Lord.”

The four lunar eclipses came and went, and, although the world did not end, we gained another dubious meme: Blood Moon.

According to astronomers, there is another kind of Blood Moon, unrelated to eclipses. In folklore, all the full moons have names that typically coincide with months of the year or seasons. One of the most famous lunar monikers is Hunter’s Moon. This is the full moon immediately following the Harvest Moon, which occurs close to the autumn equinox.

The Hunter’s Moon is also sometimes called the Blood Moon because it is a characteristic of the autumn full moons to appear nearly full – and rise soon after sunset – for several evenings in a row. Many people see them when they are low in the sky, shortly after they have risen, at which time there is more atmosphere between us and the moon than when the moon is overhead. When the moon hangs low in the sky, the extra air between us and the moon makes it appear reddish, hence the name, Blood Moon.

In the final analysis, according to the scientific dynamic, the Blood Moon or Lunar Tetrad refers to four lunar eclipses in succession minus any partial lunar eclipses in between, each of which is separated from the other by six lunar months (six full moons).

A lunar eclipse can only happen at full moon. At such times, Earth is directly between the sun and moon, and Earth’s dark umbral shadow falls on the moon’s face.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jarrette Fellows, Jr. is Publisher and Editor of Compton Herald. He attended junior and senior high school in Compton, and is an alumnus of California State University, Los Angeles.

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