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Water Board: Vote ‘No’ on billion-dollar Delta Tunnels project

The Compton Herald is urging the Board of Directors Division IV Central Basin Municipal Water District to vote “No” on the proposed multi-billion-dollar Delta Tunnels project

Compton Herald | Delta Tunnels
A section of the Colorado River Aqueduct. Southern California receives about 30 percent of its water from the State Water Project and relies heavily on the Colorado River Aqueduct. Photo: The Center For Land Use Interpretation

Delta Tunnels project could raise average household water bills by hundreds of dollars

The Compton Herald is urging the Board of Directors Division IV Central Basin Municipal Water District to vote “No” on the proposed multi-billion-dollar Delta Tunnels project which could raise average household water bills by as much as $200-$400 a year.

The cities of Lynwood, South Gate, Florence-Graham, Willowbrook, Compton, and Carson are comprised of hardworking residents who cannot afford an increase in their taxes amounting to hundreds of dollars.

We hope that Leticia Vasquez, our director, who was re-elected in November 2016, and the other directors of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWD) will turn thumbs down to the Delta Tunnels project in concert with the wishes of their constituents.

It would also be unfair to residents in the aforementioned cities to have to bear the burden of paying for the construction of tunnels which would not benefit them –  the Delta Tunnels would not deliver any additional water to southeast Los Angeles County residents. The tunnel project, instead, would only benefit inland agri-business.

The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California appears to be in good shape, according to information on its website. MWD is responsible importing water from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers through the State Water Project and from the Colorado River via the Colorado River Aqueduct. Imported water is a supplemental resource to groundwater.

Southern California receives about 30 percent of its water from the State Water Project and relies heavily on the Colorado River Aqueduct. For over 70 years, the aqueduct has been supplying the region with a major source of supplemental water.

And with the recent heavy rains which effectively ended California’s epic drought, we see no reason for the state and Southeast L.A. County’s water picture to change.

Directors, please – no new taxes for water or water projects.

Compton Herald is a digital news publication providing clear, fair and current news, information and commentary about Compton and the Los Angeles metropolitan area of California, and the world.

8 COMMENTS
  • Nick Adolfo August 27, 2017

    None of this would be necessary if we just reclaimed the millions upon millions of gallons of water the Southern California dumps in the ocean every day.

  • Leroy Essek August 27, 2017

    There are several companies that can cost effectively recycle agricultural waste waster, grey water, sewage water and desalinate ocean or brackish water. The added benefit of the ultra low cost purified water from any source is the production of highly profitable low cost zero pollution electricity 24/7 or on demand. The State of California would benefit from contacting Traver Kennedy, Tom Sephton, Langson Energy and researching Cavitation Energy Systems. .

  • Jim Odling August 26, 2017

    Good news! Leticia Vasquez can do it. Central Basin needs to stop being part of problems. Next drop their membership in the destructive and ill-named San Gabriel River Discovery Center Authority project, They have donated hundreds of thousands of rate payer dollars to it, a project that would increase global warming and traffic,

  • Mike August 25, 2017

    Your characterization of the project is one-sided. One of the benefits of the project is to increase reliability of the water that is already being delivered, without necessarily increasing the amount of water. It therefore has benefit to Southern California, and agribusiness The Delta levees could fail, inundating the Delta with salt water from back flow, cutting off the water supply to Tracy through the fragile Delta system.

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