Home / City of Compton  / Compton residents want to know: Where did the money go?

Compton residents want to know: Where did the money go?

Compton residents unhappy about the mire in which the City finds itself; many want to know what happened to money earmarked for certain municipal improvements COMPTON — Increasing numbers of local residents are asking the same

Compton residents unhappy about the mire in which the City finds itself; many want to know what happened to money earmarked for certain municipal improvements

COMPTON — Increasing numbers of local residents are asking the same question as it relates to municipal improvements in Compton and a lack of money to finance them: Where did the money go?

Here are some of their concerns and speculation.

Chris Petit: “You’d have to do a thorough examination of all of Compton’s taxes and assessments to get an understanding of why Compton residents are so furious about taxation. A $.01 cent sales tax is a compound tax on top of (1) Third highest property tax in Los Angeles County. (2) Two school bonds through 2046. (3) Bonds for Compton College (controlled by El Camino College). (4) Water Department assessments

The only questions that need to be asked — “How did we get here? What happened to the money? (Editor’s Note: The questions have been asked ad infinitum).

Residents deserve to be angry for the way their money has been spent. They are not angry at young people and new ideas; they are angry that they are being asked to pay for problems they themselves did not cause. Add to this, some in the City Council have spent such a short time in the city, that they routinely disregard the history and culture of the city in chasing these so-called solutions.

Devonte Styles: “Here’s the thing; you raise taxes … Say it’s going to help fix roads and it never happens. Residents have seen this over and over. Research the history.”

Linnell Roberts:  “Here’s the big problem. Since 2009, Compton has $69 million in Bond Measure money that hasn’t been used. So the IRS fined the City $1 million. The school bond was $350 million [and still] Compton’s schools are a shambles. Wait [until we] get that property tax increase in a few years. The City keeps finding ways to tax the citizens. Compton [ranks among] the highest taxed cities in the state. But the money is here. [City] officials say [we] are in a deficit, but it’s an internal one created from moving money from one department to another. [Compton] has been neglected for 15 years due to corruption.”

Luz Hernandez: “Unfortunately no matter how much they tax Compton in 30 years there has been very little or no improvement.”

This is why the Compton Herald is earnestly looking for “electable” Compton candidates to endorse backed by the power of the press. The City craves new leadership and we aim to exercise a heavy hand in the identification, selection, and introduction of prospects.

We’re looking for promising political aspirants not given to nepotism, cronyism, or hedonism, but possessed of the rare qualities characterized by moral integrity, independence, creativity, humility, pragmatism, and a willingness to lay aside ego to negotiate with peers for the greater good.

If these attributes are a fit, the editors of the Compton Herald would like to get to know you and get behind your candidacy. Race and gender have no bearing. Submit your resume and vision for Compton posthaste to thecomptonherald@gmail.com

 

Jarrette Fellows, Jr. is Publisher and Editor of Compton Herald. He attended junior and senior high school in Compton, and is an alumnus of California State University, Los Angeles.

NO COMMENTS

Join the conversation!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.