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Compton Herald | Black Mexico: Unearthing the Third RootBlack Mexico: Unearthing the ‘Third Root’ is a multi-part series on Mexico’s 15th-century assimilation of Spaniards, indigenous Indians, and African slaves. This led to the founding of Los Angeles by Afro-Mexicans and mestizos in the 18th century, while California was under the Mexican flag. As the Black imprint in Mexico unravels, the truth is mired in a Shadow History, buried away in libraries and missing from history lessons in Mexico or in the U.S.

This invaluable history has largely been available only as scholarly works. Compton Herald researched and scaled-down this history from many reliable sources, and presents it for your enjoyment. The goal: Illustrating the ties that bind together the people of L. A.

Compton Herald news features and commentary about the state of Black Mexico are also shown on this archive page. — the editor




Compton Herald | Black Mexico

The research, soul immersion, writing, and the engaging feedback received from numerous readers made this series one of the most rewarding journalistic endeavors of my

Compton Herald | Afro-Mex cuisine

African slaves brought culinary traditions that eventually infused a rich tradition called Afro-Mex cuisine.

Compton Herald | Zambo

Zambo is a term of Spanish origin describing Latin Americans of mixed African and Amerindian racial descent.

Compton Herald | Pío Pico

The legacy of Mexican California's final governor is enshrined in street names, schools, parks, and businesses across Southern California.

Compton Herald | Building Los Angeles

The original pobladores were rewarded by the provincial Mexican government for their sacrifice and hardship in helping forge Pueblo de Los Angeles

Compton Herald | founding of Los Angeles

More evidence of the Third Root - Mexico’s ancient melding with Africans - is extracted from Mexico’s buried history and reveals ties to the founding

Compton Herald | Colonial Los Angeles

The original settlers of Los Angeles were racially mixed persons of indigenous Indian, African, and European descent

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The Mexican government and the Mexican population at large ignore the truth, even as the evidence of a shared African history grows.

Compton Herald | Gaspar Yanga

The flight of Africans into the highlands of Veracruz provided the foundation for a famous rebellion led by escaped African slave, Gaspar Yanga, in Mexico

Compton Herald | Black Mexico

Spaniards, African slaves, and indigenous Indians in Colonial Mexico forged a unique ethnic blend known as 'Black Mexico'

Compton Herald | Heroes of Color Gaspar Yanga

In Heroes of Color, David Heredia breaks down the history of Gaspar Yanga in a clear and engaging timeline with attractive animations

Compton Herald | African rhythms Coyollilo Festival

The African-Mexican confluence in music and dance is one of the rich legacies spawned by the assimilation of African rhythms into indigenous native culture in

Compton Herald | Duality: Blaxicans of L.A.

The project highlights the Blaxican community of Los Angeles, and celebrates the merging of cultures and identities

Descendants of Africans living in Mexico were finally able to self-identify as Black in the 2015 national census; 1.38 million Afro-Mexicans counted

Publisher and editor Jarrette Fellows, Jr. on how the shared history of Latinos and Blacks in the Americas should be classroom curriculum

Afro-Mexicans experience societal neglect and are not recognized as a distinct ethnic and racial group

Based on the weapons used, federal security forces/military or organized crime could be responsible.

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Photographer Tony Gleaton left a rich pictorial legacy of Africans in Mexico, Central, and South America, and the Caribbean

ComptonHerald.com | Black Mexicans

Afro-Mexicans say that much of the history of los mexicanos negros is untaught or ignored by the rest of the country

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