Home / In memoriam  / Alfred Moore, LAUSD educator dies at 81

Alfred Moore, LAUSD educator dies at 81

Blood cancer claims educator Alfred Scott Moore; served the Los Angeles Unified School District for 36 years Funeral services for longtime Los Angeles Unified School District educator Alfred Scott Moore will be held July 17 at 11:30

Blood cancer claims educator Alfred Scott Moore; served the Los Angeles Unified School District for 36 years

Funeral services for longtime Los Angeles Unified School District educator Alfred Scott Moore will be held July 17 at 11:30 a.m. in the Manchester Chapel at the Inglewood Park Cemetery and Mortuary. Moore died June 21 in Culver City of blood cancer.

ComptonHerald.com | obituaries

ComptonHerald.com obituaries

He was 81 years old.
Moore, the youngest of 13 children, was born in Galveston, Texas and migrated to Los Angeles in 1943 with his oldest brother in pursuit of a career as a jazz saxophonist. Finding a musician’s salary to be inadequate for rearing a family, Moore set his sights on becoming an educator and pursued his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in education at UCLA, USC and Cal State, Los Angeles.

Armed with the accoutrement of education, Moore became a consummate educator and served the children of Los Angeles in various capacities over the next 36 years. He began his career as a teacher at 79th Street Elementary School for seven years, until the LAUSD officials sent him to 36th Street Training School, where he served as a “mentor teacher” to younger up-and-coming educators. He was transferred to Nora Sterry Elementary School on the west side where he continued mentoring junior teachers and teaching special education classes.Those who worked with Moore relate that he was guided by core principles in his teaching. They said that in designing the daily program, Moore ensured that students received a “balanced curriculum” that included language arts, mathematics, social science, music, arts and physical education during the course of the school day. Moore is said to have believed that the classroom should be an interactive space where students could manipulate ideas and apply what they learned.In the late 1960s, Moore moved into school site administration. He was assigned assistant principal at Martin Luther King Elementary School in 1969. He served as principal of Hooper Avenue Elementary School until 1977 and was appointed principal of 95th Street School in 1980. Moore’s success as a principal attracted the attention of other leaders throughout the LAUSD. In 1985, the school board appointed Moore to Region D superintendent, and as such, he directed and coordinated district programs for 80 schools located on Los Angeles’ west side. Thereafter, Moore worked as as superintendent in various capacities, including policy implementation and evaluation, as head of the Education Planning and Research Unit, as head of the Office of School Operation, which provided support services for 648 elementary and secondary schools and centers.

He ended his career in 1991 as an assistant superintendent within the Office of the Deputy Superintendent, where he organized and directed task forces to address the emerging AIDS/HIV and gang violence crises. According to his daughter, Alva Moore Stevenson, Moore was most proud of his work in trying to bring about racial justice in Los Angeles. She said one of his legacies is his contribution to the advancement of Black Angelenos, adding that, “of course, as a teacher and administrator in Black communities, Moore was intimately involved in addressing issues that impinged on black life.” Moore became a member and leader of several community organizations which arose in the aftermath of the 1965 Watts riot.

In addition to Stevenson, Moore is survived by his other daughter Rosenda; two grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; three sisters-in-law and 13 nieces and nephews. He was a widower.

Betty Pleasant is a contributing writer and columnist for the Compton Herald. She was formerly a reporter at the Los Angeles Sentinel and a columnist at the Los Angeles Wave.

NO COMMENTS

Join the conversation!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.